EDWIN WASHINGTON PROJECT.

The Project is seeking to archive and preserve thousands of lost records covering 1864 to 1968 that were almost burned. These include documents and photographs which we would like to make available for study and interpretation of the educational system during a pivotal time.
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9.2 How Edwin Washington Project Handles Maps

Over the course of our research, we have tried to locate where every historic school sat, in addition to who attended or instructed at the facility.

Historic Maps:  Many historic maps already exist in the files and will be scanned for the benefit of the public, as well as deeds and information on how schools were constructed.   Samples of these maps are found at this location.

Digital Map Application:  We have developed a digital app to show the location of schools, administrative buildings and teacher cottages (private and public) which existed in Loudoun prior to integration.  Popups contain historical and contemporary photographs, the street address or  coordinates and links to more information on our website.  The app uses Google technology, so it will easy to achieve driving and walking directions; but before visiting a site, the user must obtain permission to enter the property.  We do plan on annual tours to specific interesting sites; but except for those organized events, use of the mapping tool does not convey any license to enter a property.  We also plan on software upgrades in 2019 in order to show routes to schools, bus stops, segregated community polygons and other tools.  Many students went to more than one schools, e.g. Willisville, then Banneker or Saint Louis, then Douglass.  We hope to show these patterns on the map, as they evolved over time.

Please note: Some of these school sites are on PRIVATE property. Before visiting a site, the user must obtain permission to enter the property.  Use of the mapping tool does not convey any license to enter a property.

2018 School Table Study August We still don’t know the exact location of some school houses and teacher cottages.   Keep in mind that in 1888 there were 86 public schools for whites and 34 for African-Americans, then in 1913, 102 for whites and 26 for African-Americans.  The numbers varied over time.  To help researchers, we will provide a regularly updated “table of schools” including all of the location material from the digital application and whatever we surmise from records and written and oral accounts about a school’s location, even if not precise.

In some instances we just know the road or School District.  This document should always be considered a draft, so please share any proposed corrections with us.  Before visiting a site, the user must obtain permission to enter the property.  We do plan on annual tours to specific interesting sites; but except for those organized events, use of the map table does not convey any license to enter a property.